Topic: fertiliser

Can you host a research trial in a nutrient deficient paddock?

Do you want to help with crop nutrition research? One of the GRDC’s latest research projects (UQ00082) needs nutrient deficient trial sites. The trial sites will help develop guidelines for nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K) and sulfur (S) for broad-leaved crops in eastern Australia.  
For cereals, we know the […]

Where exactly are nutrients in the soil? Does stratification matter?

Soils naturally form layers, and when nutrients concentrate in an area it’s called stratification. Soil type and agronomic practices affect stratification. Stratified nutrients can be a problem when nutrients are concentrated somewhere crops can’t access when they need them.
Mobile nutrients such as Nitrogen and Sulphur can form bulges below the […]

Nutrient Performance Indicators for your paddocks

text as graphic about why nutrient performance indicators are used.

Nutrient performance indicators (NPIs) are calculations you can do to assess how effective and efficient fertiliser applications have been. Underusing fertiliser limits crop yield and can draw down soil reserves. Unless building soil reserves, overuse is a waste of money, as excess nutrients can be lost and may cause environmental […]

How to manage nitrogen in no-till residues

Crop residues influence the supply and uptake of nitrogen (N). In the long term, residues will improve soil fertility. Stubbles can immobilise soil N as they break down. Moisture makes a big difference to the rate of stubble decomposition and mineralisation of nitrogen in the soil.
Nathan Craig was involved […]

New deep P tool calculates the benefits and payback for you

Subsoil phosphorus (P) deficiency costs growers in Queensland and Northern NSW around $80–100 million each year in reduced yield. Deep P fertiliser applications into the subsoil can improve yield but are a long-term decision. They are moderately expensive and returns are not immediate. The Deep-P calculator helps Northern region growers […]

Kick-start crops with compost

Compost can improve overall soil health and benefit crops. The organic matter may improve soil structure, infiltration and porosity.  The soil’s water and nutrient holding capacity may get a boost. Compost feeds the microbes in soil, which in turn increases soil fertility.
Compost and nutrients
Individual composts are different. The source […]

Quality fertiliser decisions backed by science

Australian crop advisors can use the best available science to give fertiliser advice. The Better Fertiliser Decisions for Cropping (BFDC) database:

is the best available data resource
is continually upgraded with the latest field trial results
holds data from over 5,600 research trials looking at fertiliser response
underpins the recommendations of Fertcare […]